Watching the wind for whitetail success

 

Watching the wind for whitetail success

by Craig Lamb

 

Wind is a crucial factor in determining whitetail deer success. Do you factor in the wind all season or just when it’s bitter cold or during the rut?

You might be surprised just how critical the wind plays into bagging an early season, prized whitetail buck during archery season.

“More hunters are in the woods during the early season, so that adds lots of pressure on where to go,” says Jake Miller of the TenPoint Crossbow Technologies staff.

More hunters mean fewer options on prime shooting locations as whitetail deer begin to move around. That makes environmental factors, namely the wind, an even greater consideration.

“If the wind is wrong and you hunt that stand anyway then you are alerting the deer to your exact location,” explains Miller. “I always completely avoid a good area early in the season if the wind isn’t right.”

By their nature deer are wary of the unknown. Miller rightfully believes that if you leave a scent in the wrong place, early in the season, the deer will mark that area and avoid it later on as a place of danger.

“It’s easy to let excitement overrule good judgment in the early season,” he admits. “But waiting and considering other options will play out in the hunter’s favor in the long term.”

That being the case planning ahead for the wind is a good idea. When on stand the wind cannot be blowing into the deer path, nor can the direction be from where they are coming. Just remember the wind must not always be in your face. A stout crosswind blowing your scent into a dead area, or place where the deer will not maneuver, is often best.

You can also plan how you enter an already set stand. If the wind is perfect and you come from the wrong direction you’ve literally blown it. Approach the stand, if possible, from the direction that will not blow your scent into the deer.

Also, consider wind thermals. Especially in early season, warming and cooling air causes thermals to rise and fall. Wind direction might appear favorable but hilly terrain causes thermals and swirling air currents. Overall, thermals rise in the morning as the day warms and then diminish in the evening as it cools down.

Waiting on the right wind, or better yet, finding the best wind, requires mobility on the part of the hunter. For crossbow hunters that makes lighter better when it comes to the crossbow.

Horton Storm

Horton Storm

The Horton Storm RDX is perfect to form for hunters staying on the go in early season. It weighs just 8.2 pounds and fires 400-grain arrows at a blistering 370 feet per second. That translates to muzzle energy of about 122 buck-stopping foot-pounds.

“The Storm RDX is a lightweight, compact crossbow that allows great maneuverability if you need to travel through heavy brush to get to your stand,” explains Miller. “That can be a huge factor in early season when undercover and plants are still growing.”

So is the impressive 10-inch axle-to-axle length when cocked. The narrow profile makes it a plus for taking aim on an unexpected buck when travel to or from a stand, or when ground hunting.

Another plus is the crossbow’s namesake RDX Technology, which stands for Reverse Draw Crossbow. Having the riser and limbs facing backward makes the crossbow easier to shoulder as the center of gravity is pushed toward the shooter.

Adding to the comfort are adjustable butt and cheek plates. The butt plate has three positions for setting the right length of pull, while the cheek plate can be adjusted vertically in seven positions to ensure perfect fit to the stock.

Dedd Sled

Dedd Sled

 

 

AcuDraw

AcuDraw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Storm RDX comes in standard and premium packages from $1,269. The standard package comes with a Horton 4×32 Multi-Line Scope, your choice of ACUdraw Cocking Mechanism or Dedd Sled 50, Horton 3-Arrow Quiver and three carbon arrows. The premium package comes with the above and a TenPoint 3x Pro-View Scope.

 

Visit TenPoint Crossbows.com  Today!

 

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

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